Forest vertical cities in China: first forest city under construction covered in 1 million plants; produce 900 tons oxygen daily

Architect Stefano Boeri sees green — not necessarily money — but green air cities in China’s future. The first forest city has begun construction in Liuzhou, Guangxi Province, China. Not only is it beautiful, conceptually, it promises to be a breath of fresh air to China’s toxic cities. Urban density and fast growth have resulted in heavily polluted cities in China. Although other countries are eyeing Boeri’s concepts of “vertical forest cities”, China is embracing the idea.

 

 

Forest City Liuzhou, Guangxi Province China by Stefano Boeri Architect.

 

 

“We have been asked to design an entire city where you don’t only have one tall building but you have 100 or 200 buildings of different sizes, all with trees and plants on the facades,” Boeri said. “We are working very seriously on designing all the different buildings. I think they will start to build at the end of this year.” [1]

Forest City Liuzhou, Guangxi Province China by Stefano Boeri Architect.

Quick Facts

  • The entire vertical face of the buildings are covered in nearly 1 million plants
  • First community will house 30,000 people
  • The green will absorb almost 10,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide and 57 tonnes of pollutants
  • The city will produce 900 tonnes of oxygen.
  • Will reduce average air temperature and air quality
  • Will reduce noise
  • Will increase biodiversity and create living habitats
  • Total 175-hectare area along Liujang River.

Liuzhou Forest City will also be self-sustaining with its own renewable energy power generation including geothermal and solar. Rapid rail and infrastructure for electric cars are planned. The project should be completed in only three years.

 

Forest City Liuzhou, Guangxi Province China by Stefano Boeri Architect.

 

Vertical Forests Buildings

Stefano Beori’s vision goes beyond the “test city. His building concepts include high rises in major cities covered in a virtual forest climbing vertically into the sky. He plans office towers and condos and hotels all green from top to bottom. One of his first projects in Asia was Nanjing Green Towers: two towers side-by-side, covered in 2500 cascading shrubs, already under construction and set to be completed next year. It will include a hotel. (See inset photo)

 

Stefano Boeri’s original Nanjing Green Towers, the “vertical forest concept.”

 

Boeri described it as a proof of concept: “Two towers in a huge urban environment is so, so small a contribution – but it is an example. We hope that this model of green architecture can be repeated and copied and replicated.”

NOTES

[1] The Guardian 

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