SNC-Lavalin to build $4.2 billion Champlain Bridge in Montreal

SNC-Lavalin-Champlain-Bridge-Montreal-infrastructure-PPP-engineering-EDIWeekly

Engineering giant SNC-Lavalin Group will head a consortium to replace the Champlain Bridge across the Saint Lawrence River in Montreal. The federal government’s infrastructure minister, Denis Label, said the cost of the public-private partnership (PPP) project would be $4.2 billion. The consortium, called Signature on the Saint-Lauren Group, will design, build and finance the project. Construction is projected to cost $2.25 billion, with completion set for the end of 2018. The consortium, in which SNC-Lavalin is a 50 per cent partner, will also maintain and operate the bridge until 2049.

The Champlain Bridge is the major gateway into the city of Montreal, handling from 40 to 60 million cars, trucks and buses each year, according to SNC-Lavalin. As well, more than $20 billion in cross-border goods pass through the trade corridor of which the bridge is a part each year.

A second, smaller bridge to Nun’s Island in the St. Lawrence River is included in the contract. Also included is the reconstruction and widening of a portion of highway, the Autoroute 15, as well as the operation of a new Champlain Bridge Corridor and tolling infrastructure.

The announcement comes just days after SNC-Lavalin was named as one of the builders of Toronto’s $5 billion Eglinton Crosstown LRT system.

The company has been awarded these large PPP projects despite its legal difficulties, arising from charges of fraud in Libya and Bangladesh. SNC-Lavalin was facing charges of bribery and fraud involving tens of millions of dollars and could have been banned from bidding on government projects in Canada. The company has in fact been banned from bidding on any of the reported $1 trillion worth of infrastructure projects being built or planned by the World Bank. The ban was imposed in 2013 and was to last for ten years, also affecting more than 100 affiliates of SNC-Lavalin.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Canada adopts ISO 20022 international electronic payment standard
  • Airbus and Bombardier Finalize Deal
  • Ontario government accepts mining report recommendations
  • Cars and oil pulled Canada's manufacturing down in September
  • Transit groups call Ontario budget a step in the right direction
  • MRO continuing its rebound after Aveos collapse
  • For some car makers March was best ever
  • Space X's Falcon Heavy could explode with the force of a nuclear weapon; over 1400 airline flights delayed by space launches in 2018
  • Manufacturing sector faced difficult conditions in September: survey
  • World's first municipal waste-to-biofuels plant opens in Edmonton
  • Elon Musk's stainless steel "Starship" from SpaceX — orbit test in six months, then on to Mars?
  • Fracking study finds methane emissions lower than EPA estimates
  • Alberta to allow increased production of 25,000 barrels of oil per day in April; eases mandatory production cuts
  • Fewer building permits in February for non-residential construction
  • Cars new and used dominate Canada's exports
  • Wind energy on growth trend, major offshore project proposed for Nova Scotia
  • Wind to provide 20 per cent of world's electricity by 2030: report
  • Canada's oil sands dispute with EU flares
  • Ford hiring 1,000 at Oakville assembly plant
  • Zero-emissions vehicle strategy by 2018 for Canada with major boost to zero emissions infrastructure
Scroll to Top