Bombardier CSeries finally flies the skies of Paris

BOMBARDIER-Paris-CSeries-Boeing-Airbus-EDIWeekly

The Paris Air Show is one of the premier aviation events in the world, but the CEO of Bombardier said in the Financial Post last week, “It’s just an event.” Alain Bellemare did not intend to diss Paris. What he meant by the comment was that it won’t be the making or breaking of his company’s long-awaited CSeries jets, which have finally made their debut in Paris. Whether the company secures a lot of new orders or doesn’t, having a flight display CS300 and a static display CS100 in Paris will be good for the aircraft’s visibility, and could drive future sales. The Paris presence will help to build “brand momentum” he said.

The CSeries certainly has bragging rights for novelty; it is the first entirely new single-aisle aircraft to be shown at the Paris show in three decades.

Of course, orders would be good. Bombardier’s arch-rivals Boeing and Airbus have already announced large orders for their single-aisle jets, orders worth billions of dollars. A Wall Street Journal video report says that the two big plane makers have been fiercely competitive in “elbowing out” Bombardier wherever they could, trying to make sure it doesn’t gain the traction it seeks with the new CSeries, which competes with their smallest jets. So far, Bombardier has managed to secure 243 firm orders for the as yet unknown CSeries, still short of the 300 orders it hopes to have before the jets enter service.

With its advertised high performance and fuel economy, the company is promising a 20 per cent fuel burn advantage, giving the jets a range of 6,112 kilometres, or 3,300 nautical miles. It can also carry more passengers than originally promised, a fact that the company’s president said would make the jets even more profitable to operate.

The market Bombardier is going after with its 90–150-seat CSeries is the replacement market in Europe and the United States and the growing markets in China and South Asia. The company’s own forecasts show demand for commercial aircraft of this size reaching 12,700 units delivered between this year and 2035.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Wind capacity reaches 82,183 megawatts in US, enough to power 24 million homes
  • Norwegian group claims world's first seabed energy storage technology
  • Manufacturing sector growth slower in May
  • GPS III set to launch December 18: U.S. Air Force to launch via Space X Falcon 9 paylod; will be harder to jam, more secure and accurate
  • Magna International acquires German transmission giant
  • Guidelines released for self-driving cars by Trump administration: "future of safety and mobility" according to some; recipe for "disaster" say others
  • Ontario to invest $900 million in energy-saving retrofits in social housing, rental stock
  • Ford announces Edge production will remain in Oakville
  • Manufacturing gains in September driven by auto and food industries
  • Brighter outlook for Canada's economy in 2016: RBC
  • Canada's oil and gas industry gathering in Toronto for two-day forum
  • New GO buses will be assembled in GTA
  • Canadian companies should look to Mexico for export growth: HSBC Bank Canada
  • Tesla Roadster not only zero-to-sixty in 1.9 seconds — the next iteration may actually fly, says Elon Musk, CEO
  • Bombardier flies new CSeries jet for first time
  • Automation, robotics to have profound effect on industry in coming years
  • Strong manufacturing output lifts GDP in October
  • Industries, designers not doing enough to recycle metals: UN
  • NASA Tests Distant Voyager Spacecraft
  • Game over for Hydrogen fuel cells? Not really — but an explosion in Norway halts sales of hydrogen fuel cell cars locally
Scroll to Top