Microgrids coming to two Ontario power utilities

Tesla-Powerwall-microgrid-utility-power-distribution-solar-wind-renewable-energy-storage-EDIWeekly

Two Ontario cities are moving ahead with plans to incorporate utility microgrids in their traditional power grids. A microgrid is a small-scale local energy grid with its own power resources, generation and loads. Microgrids, can disconnect from the main power grid when necessary, as in a main power outage, and continue to operate autonomously. Microgrids have been set up to power single facilities, such as hospitals, as well as larger areas, such as a complete university campus.

The utility that serves 119,000 customers in the Ajax area, Veridian Connections, announced that it plans to create two residential microgrids in the second quarter of this year. One of the microgrids will generate 10 KWh of solar power and employ a 14KWh lithium-ion battery for storage. The other will use solar combined with a 7KWh Tesla Powerwall energy storage system. According to Opus One Solutions, which designed the software to run the microgrids, the system will minimize the cost of electricity under time-of-use rates.

The president and CEO of Veridian, Michael Angemeer, said that the planned residential microgrids provide an ideal opportunity for integrating renewables and take the utility a step further toward adding all types of microgrids, to the benefit of both Veridian and its customers.

Earlier, the city of Sault Ste. Marie said it was requesting proposals for economic analysis of a planned microgrid. The city’s utility company, PUC Services, has been working on the project since 2013. Sault Ste. Marie, a city with a population of 75,000, already generates 189 MW of green electricity from a wind farm, as well as almost 400 MW of hydroelectricity and 60 MW from a solar installation. A combined heat and power plant provides another 70 MW.

The Sault Ste. Marie utility, according to Microgrid Knowledge, has already determined that a microgrid would reduce system voltage and improve efficiency and reliability. It will do this by incorporating voltage regulation technology to allow it to reduce distribution voltage at will. Voltage reduction reduces energy consumption, and therefore saves customers money on their energy bill. Voltage optimization, meanwhile, improves distribution system efficiency. Demand management gives the utility to control customer energy consumption at peak demand times.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Closing GM Oshawa would cost economy billions: UNIFOR
  • U.S. and Mexico resume talks for NAFTA auto agreement — door open for Canada to return to negotiations
  • Manufacturing closer to stabilizing in January: report
  • Strength to build on, but Canada still lags in industrial R&D
  • Global car sales up, luxury auto market surging in Canada: Scotiabank
  • The big picture: How 5G will change industry forever — 4th industrial revolution?
  • Engineering positions: what's in demand, what does it pay, what do you need to qualify? Top seven engineering positions
  • Tech Firms Exploring the Future of Transport
  • 3D printed homes in 24 Hours — printed on site: printed villas, offices and floating saunas?
  • Ottawa medical device company receives government support to expand production
  • US resumes exports of LNG
  • GE expanding cold-weather jet engine facility in Winnipeg
  • Truckers hopeful about progress on border security, emissions, after Washington summit
  • Five defence industry technologies — right out of science fiction — that are real today
  • West Coast group looking at LNG as marine fuel
  • BC, Ontario economies to lead country into 2017
  • Manufacturers group says government policies reflect its input
  • Pharmaceuticals, medical supplies lead June exports to 8-year high
  • Honda to spend $492 million on Alliston plant upgrades
  • New Samsung-Pattern wind farm underway with Siemens-built turbines
Scroll to Top