NASA’s ambitious Space Launch System SLS for Artemis Moon Missions ready for tests

NASA’s new Space Launch System (SLS) is finally ready for testing after assembly in New Orleans at the Michoud Assembly Facility. The Artemis is key to NASA’s next deep space and moon missions, especially for the planned high payload to the proposed Gateway project.

The SLS is the ambitious high payload rocket, designed and built for future Moon and deep space missions, according to Deputy Administrator Jim Morhard:

“The SLS rocket was built to deliver American astronauts and maximum payloads to the Moon and deep space destinations. Rolling out the completed core stage from NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility to go on to NASA’s Stennis Space Center for further testing is an exciting leap forward in the Artemis program as NASA teams make progress toward the launch pad.”

Photo of SLS being moved. NASA.

Green Run Tests

The next stage will be testing, which involves the delicate move to the Stennis Space Centre near Bay St. Louis, Mississipi — via the Pegasus barge. The first test will be a Green Run Test, scheduled currently for later this year. These will carefully evaluate the four RS-25 rocket engines.

Although late in coming, the SLS will be key to the Artemis Moon Missions, which will “lay the groundwork for sustainable infrastructure to support missions to Mars and beyond.” (from a NASA Tweet).

 

The SLS on its way to the barge. NASA.

 

“NASA’s SLS rocket is designed to evolve so a variety of missions can be accomplished first to the Moon for the Artemis missions and then to Mars and other deep-space destinations,” explained John Honeycutt, the SLS Program Manager at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Cente.

The SLS specs are impressive, including two propellant tanks with a combined 733,000 gallons of fuel to run four RS-25 Engines.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Could the Future of Energy be Entirely Renewable?
  • Large electric aircraft feasible with record-breaking Siemens motor
  • Zero-emissions vehicle strategy by 2018 for Canada with major boost to zero emissions infrastructure
  • Deep Roads — researchers propose taking road expansion underground to reduce congestion and pollution
  • Andritz to manufacture stator coils for NA hydropower market in Peterborough
  • Manufacturing sales up in November, government scraps duties on imported food ingredients
  • First Nation's groups propose specific risk mitigation that could "save the pipeline"
  • Samsung will invest $7 Billion for NAND flash-memory manufacturing in China
  • Will Ukraine be Canada's next big oil market?
  • Engineers use captured carbon to create new form of concrete
  • Electricity-conducting cement could make runways, roads ice proof
  • Manufacturers and employers win with new Labour rules in Ontario; jobs did increase 17,600 in January 2019
  • Pratt & Whitney Canada announces helicopter engine contracts
  • Manufacturing takes a hit as water heater plant closes in Fergus
  • Wood groups praising new six-storey construction limit
  • Canada should ease foreign ownership rules for uranium, says Sask premier
  • Propane suppliers condemn Ontario government's support of natural gas expansion
  • Tech Firms Exploring the Future of Transport
  • Successful SpaceX human flight transport launch test of Dragon crew capsule, Elon Musk elated but "emotionally exhausted"
  • Volvo aims to put garbage collectors out of work with autonomous robot garbage trucks
Scroll to Top