Pilot project will use algae to recycle industrial CO2 emissions

The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) announced that it will build a pilot facility that will use algae to recycle industrial CO2 emissions int0 valuable products such as biofuels. Together with Canadian Natural Resources and Pond Biofuels, NRC will build the $19 million facility, which it says will be a “game changer for industry,” in Alberta. The Algal Carbon Conversion Pilot Project has the potential, a joint release from the project’s partners says, to “revolutionize” how industrial carbon emissions are managed.

National-Research-Council-NRC-Canada-Algal-Carbon-Conversion-Pilot-Project-biomass-algae-CO2-emissions-industry-EDIWeekly
Model of the demonstration-scale biorefinery that will be established in Alberta to test the feasibility of using algae to recycle industrial CO2 emissions into biofuel.

The partners in the pilot project will establish a demonstration-scale algal biorefinery at a Canadian Natural site, near Bonnyville, Alberta. Industrial emissions will be recycled by using carbon dioxide to grow algal biomass, which will undergo further processing into products, such as biofuels, livestock feed and products to improve soil.

The goal of the project is to test the viability and feasibility of such a facility. If successful, the model can then be used for recycling industrial emissions across industries elsewhere.

The CEO of Pond Biofuels, Steven Martin, said that the work establishes Canada as “the world leader” in carbon capture and recycling. Pond Biofuels currently works with the cement and steel industries to implement algae technology.

The announcement follows statements by the Minister of State for Science and Technology, Gary Goodyear, that the NRC would henceforth be required to focus more on technology that can be of direct benefit to Canadian industry. He said at a news conference this week that the NRC had become a web of “fiefdoms” each pursuing its own agenda, and had become inflexible and unable to respond to the needs of industry. The Algal Carbon Conversion project is seen as an example of that sharpened focus on “real world” applications for industry and business development that the government expects from the re-structured NRC.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Building permits up in June, non-residential construction leading
  • Canadian cleantech sector strong in research, innovation, but weak in commercialization
  • Organic, water-based battery a game-changer for renewable energy
  • Housing starts, employment, up sharply in May
  • Modest improvement in manufacturing sector continued in July: RBC
  • Toronto Hydro testing underwater energy storage system for backup power
  • Wind more economical than nuclear: offshore wind turbines in U.K. significantly less expensive per megawatt than planned nuclear
  • World's first municipal waste-to-biofuels plant opens in Edmonton
  • UN aviation body sets first CO2 emissions standard for world's airlines
  • If Keystone XL dies, will Energy East replace it?
  • Engineers among highest paid Canada; Alberta averages highest; quarrying, mining, oil and extraction dominate wages
  • GM investing in connected car research at Waterloo U
  • Singapore scientists invent bendable concrete for low-maintenance roads
  • Thunder Bay wind farm gets government approval
  • Carbon Nanotubes — from energy storage to automotive parts, from electromagnetic shields to biomedical applications — light, stable, durable
  • Vanadium dioxide (VO2) metal conducts electricity — with ten times less heat
  • How 5G will change cities forever
  • Tesla now biggest car maker in California
  • Government money to Ontario auto parts maker will ensure jobs
  • Wave energy farm in Scotland to use Oysters
Scroll to Top