Pilot project will use algae to recycle industrial CO2 emissions

The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) announced that it will build a pilot facility that will use algae to recycle industrial CO2 emissions int0 valuable products such as biofuels. Together with Canadian Natural Resources and Pond Biofuels, NRC will build the $19 million facility, which it says will be a “game changer for industry,” in Alberta. The Algal Carbon Conversion Pilot Project has the potential, a joint release from the project’s partners says, to “revolutionize” how industrial carbon emissions are managed.

National-Research-Council-NRC-Canada-Algal-Carbon-Conversion-Pilot-Project-biomass-algae-CO2-emissions-industry-EDIWeekly
Model of the demonstration-scale biorefinery that will be established in Alberta to test the feasibility of using algae to recycle industrial CO2 emissions into biofuel.

The partners in the pilot project will establish a demonstration-scale algal biorefinery at a Canadian Natural site, near Bonnyville, Alberta. Industrial emissions will be recycled by using carbon dioxide to grow algal biomass, which will undergo further processing into products, such as biofuels, livestock feed and products to improve soil.

The goal of the project is to test the viability and feasibility of such a facility. If successful, the model can then be used for recycling industrial emissions across industries elsewhere.

The CEO of Pond Biofuels, Steven Martin, said that the work establishes Canada as “the world leader” in carbon capture and recycling. Pond Biofuels currently works with the cement and steel industries to implement algae technology.

The announcement follows statements by the Minister of State for Science and Technology, Gary Goodyear, that the NRC would henceforth be required to focus more on technology that can be of direct benefit to Canadian industry. He said at a news conference this week that the NRC had become a web of “fiefdoms” each pursuing its own agenda, and had become inflexible and unable to respond to the needs of industry. The Algal Carbon Conversion project is seen as an example of that sharpened focus on “real world” applications for industry and business development that the government expects from the re-structured NRC.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Building code change could help drain water heat recovery manufacturers
  • Canada's exports soared in June while imports fell
  • Promise of more investment in auto industry but no specifics
  • Jaguar Land Rover Set to Move Discovery Production from United Kingdom to Slovakia
  • Local Ford union rebellion over GM contract threatens pattern bargaining
  • Critical labour shortage hurting meat industry; immigration policy blamed
  • Thunder Child, the unsinkable boat? Self-righting, wavepiercing interceptor engineered to be the perfect boat for offshore patrol
  • Solar Challenge 3,000 kilometer "race" tests solar capabilities and technologies
  • NASA Tests Distant Voyager Spacecraft
  • GM investing $250 million at Ingersoll plant
  • LED bulb manufacturer receives R&D funds from Ottawa
  • SpaceX’s Falcon 9 Ripped Hole in Ionosphere During 2017 Launch
  • Could the Future of Energy be Entirely Renewable?
  • Car Tech Trends from CES 2018
  • High speed rail finally coming to Toronto-Windsor corridor? What will Ontario high speed look like?
  • A supersonic jet with no front window? NASA's X-59 uses a 4K monitor instead.
  • Bombardier to hit business jet targets: aiming for US$8.5 billion annually by 2020
  • Aerogel, 99.8 percent air — a solid so light it challenges design engineers to find an application
  • SNC's Candu Energy signs international agreements
  • Swimming Robot to Examine Damage from Japan’s Nuclear Reactor
Scroll to Top