Canada one of the world’s most energy-intensive countries: 15 percent energy reduction possible through lighting, computer and HVAC retrofitting: Conference Board of Canada Report

A combination of retrofitting initiatives may be the key to reducing Canada’s above-average energy consumption, according to a new report from the Conference Board of Canada. Canada ranks near the top of energy-intensive countries and is also among the highest greenhouse gas emitters per dollar GDP. The greenhouse emissions aren’t necessarily energy-related since 80 percent of power in Canada now comes from either renewable or low-emission sources.

The report found that the three most significant areas of potential savings for manufacturing and commercial sectors are found in retrofitting of lighting, computer equipment, automation, and HVAC equipment. The report also recommends more policy intervention, particularly related to land-use measures and equipment standards, and also subsidies for renewable energy.

 

 

Failure of programs due to consumer behaviour

In Canada, it usually falls to the utility companies to implement any programs designed to promote energy efficiency. Utilities are uniquely well-placed to conduct energy audits and energy-efficiency retrofits. The report lays the blame squarely on the energy consumers, including commercial consumers.

Len Coad, the research director at The Conference Board of Canada, reported: “energy efficient measures have not been fully adopted to the extent that it would be economically efficient to do so, in part due to market and consumers behavioural failures.”

Without conservation measures, the National Energy Board projects Canada’s energy demand will grow at an annualized rate of 0.7 percent — soaring to 13,868 petajoules by 2040. The new report from the Conference Board projects a 15 percent reduction in this usage if energy conservation becomes a priority for both manufacturers and consumers.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Canada exports more than logs and oil
  • Cap and trade law passes in Ontario, carbon pricing set to begin
  • Elon Musk, the master of disruptive technology companies: his life, successes — and failures
  • Flyboard "hoverboard" becomes real — beyond recreation, this spectacular tech may have practical applications
  • Lobby groups working hard to convince Obama on Keystone
  • Ford looking to use agave plant biomass to make green plastic for cars
  • Study of Ontario power needs finds nuclear is best option
  • Oil supply rising even as demand growth falls; investment likely to be slashed further in 2017
  • Valves essential component of safe oil pipeline
  • Space-based solar power beamed to earth may be the future of green power
  • TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline clears last hurdle in $10 billion project as Nebraska approves 3 to 2
  • $3.4 Million Invested in Hypercar with Sharper, Faster Turns
  • Honda to spend $492 million on Alliston plant upgrades
  • Ontario launches Autonomous Vehicle Innovation Network in Stratford to highlight privonce as the "go to" for Autonomous tech
  • Statoil and Husky Energy find "significant" oil offshore Newfoundland
  • Netherlands company to test plastic road construction
  • Hypersonic travel may become practical with new heat-resistant ceramic carbide material
  • Plastics use in cars to nearly double in four years: report
  • Astronauts Harvest Radishes on Space Station
  • Airline debacle highlights need for businesses to be tech smart
Scroll to Top