Final testing of Bombardier’s C Series to begin

C-Series-Bombardier-commercial-jet-aircraft-EDIWeekly
C Series interior; Photo credit: Bombardier

Bombardier said today that its new CS100 aircraft is in the final stages of certification, having successfully completed over 90 per cent of the certification program. It is now in final stages of flight testing and “on the cusp” of validating that the aircraft is ready for operation. Final certification is expected before the end of 2015. The company also said it is ramping up production for delivery of the first aircraft to its launch customer, SWISS.

The final phase will be function and reliability testing over the next few weeks. During that time, the CS100 will operate on a commercial airlines-type schedule, said the vice president of the C Series program, Rob Dewar, flying in and out of about thirty-five representative airports in North America. The testing will include airfield performance, landings, airport turnarounds, and on-ground operations, all of which will ready the aircraft for operations with SWISS in “the first half” of 2016, Dewar said.

Bombardier says that results of noise performance testing, completed in the last month, confirm that the C Series is the quietest in-production commercial jet in its class. It also confirmed that the jet’s maximum range is up to 6,112 kilometres, 648 kilometres more than originally targeted. It is also delivering “more than a 20 per cent fuel burn advantage” compared to in-production aircraft.

The company is now reported to be concentrating on finding a major buyer among North American airlines, saying that it is in “advanced discussions” with various potential customers. There have also been reports that Bombardier has approached rival Embraer of Brazil about a potential partnership. Talks of investment by Airbus in the C Series program came to a halt earlier.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Kite-style Technology Produces Tidal Power: Green Energy
  • Waste-reduction law puts responsibility for products' end-of-life costs on manufacturers
  • Ontario to improve business "climate" for automotive industry; special focus on autonomous vehicle development
  • Publication aimed at development CEOs names Ontario best investment location in Canada
  • A cloaking device possible? Stealth technology studies virtual invisibility through "irradiating with its own specific pattern"
  • Repeways by Doppelmayr Transport.
    Engineered Design: Generating Power While Transporting Freight or Ropeways: New Hybrid Belt System
  • Bombardier Transportation workers ratify contract
  • Canada's oil and gas industry gathering in Toronto for two-day forum
  • WindTwin digital platform increases efficiency on wind farms and tests maintenance upgrades
  • The challenges of 3D printing or manufacturing in space — without gravity to help it all "stick"
  • Job losses in Alberta, gains in Ontario, leave employment flat in January
  • SpaceX’s Falcon 9 Ripped Hole in Ionosphere During 2017 Launch
  • Waterloo showcases new tire devulcanization facility
  • Renault's autonomous float hover car by Yunchen Chai may be the automobile of the future — winner of a design competition from Renault
  • Wood groups praising new six-storey construction limit
  • Hypersonic travel may become practical with new heat-resistant ceramic carbide material
  • LNG Canada moves ahead with BC project as China and Russia sign huge gas deal
  • Demand for industrial real estate soaring in Canada: report
  • Ontario missing out on $billions from federal government: study
  • Williams Advance Engineering Develops Ground-Breaking Aerofoil
Scroll to Top