GO Transit may deploy hydrogen-power rather than electric; consults with Canadian fuel cell technology company that worked on world’s first hydrogen-powered train

alstom-hydrogenics-hydroen-fuel-cell-commuter-train-europe-ediweekly

 

Canadian hydrogen generation and fuel cell products developer Hydrogenics Corporation will formally undertake feasibility study for GO Transit to potentially deploy hydrogen-powered trains for Ontario. These trains have aleady proven successful in Europe, using technology developed in Canada at Hydrogenics.

The Ontario Government announced the consultation yesterday, as part of its $13.5 billion RER expansion that will see GO transit on the busy GTHA regional rail newtork— planned for 2025. Environmental assessment is a big part of that project approval, with electrification and Hydrogen-power both presented as solutions. Hydrogen power, which essentially converts Hydrogen to electric power, would be a less expensive solution, when compared to electrifying current routes.

Hydrogenics Corporation participation

Previously, in May 2015, Canadian hydrogen generation and fuel cell products developer Hydrogenics Corporation was selected  to provide at least 200 hydrogen fuel cell systems to French train maker Alstom over a ten-year period. The agreement between Hydrogenics and Alstom, worth approximately €50 million, was to develop and commercialize hydrogen-powered commuter trains for Regional Commuter Trains in Europe. The fuel cell system had to meet European train compliance regulations. At the time of the agreement, Hydrogenics CTO and co-founder Joseph Cargnelli commented that the company’s experience supplying large, reliable propulsion systems for “challenging” applications was an important consideration in Alstom’s decision.

Only two years ago, Alstom rolled out the first result of that collaboration, the zero-emission Coradia iLint commuter train, billed as the world’s first hydrogen-powered train and an environmentally friendly alternative to diesel-powered passenger trains in systems that have not yet electrified. The Coradia iLint can carry 300 passengers and travel at up to 140 kilometres per hour, with a range of 800 kilometres on a single tank of hydrogen. The Coradia iLint is a retrofit of an existing diesel model. Alstom is selling the Coradia iLint as a complete package, including the train itself, maintenance, and the hydrogen infrastructure. That infrastructure includes lithium-ion batteries that store energy that is not immediately used by the train, and an energy management system that disperses the energy efficiently throughout the vehicle.

Hydrogenics is also currently part of a German consortium working to develop fuel-cell technology for zero-emission passenger flight. The consortium, known as H2FLY, includes the DLR Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, the University of Ulm, aircraft manufacturer Pipistrel, and the airport of Stuttgart. Its vision is the advancement of emission-free electrified flight using hydrogen, and its aircraft, named HY4, is currently undergoing testing.

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • MRO continuing its rebound after Aveos collapse
  • New catalyst could help bring hydrogen fuel economy closer
  • Builders urge Ontario to allow six-storey wooden structures
  • 21 auto parts companies in Ontario invest in new technologies with help from Ontario Government
  • Hyundai Plans to Sell Millions of BEVs
  • Beam me up, Scotty. Teleportation is small step closer: researchers transport photon 500 kilometers: Micius satellite
  • Elon Musk's green vision extends to the Tesla Semi, capable of hauling 80,000 pounds for up to 400 miles on a single 30 minute charge
  • Lockheed Martin reveals breakthrough nuclear fusion process
  • Cars and aerospace boosted Canada's manufacturing sales in November
  • Too much wind-power may warm the environment more than oil or coal — at least in the short term. Harvard research suggests cautious planning needed
  • Unusual hydrogen car could soon be built in UK
  • $26 Trillion needed over 13 years to power infrastructure for world's fastest growing economies
  • Major job losses predicted on oil spending slump
  • Vancouver shipyard awarded $3.3 billion to build Coast Guard ships
  • Bombardier Challenger 350 set to fly with NetJets
  • SpaceX lost 40 satellites to solar storm, estimated cost of $10 to $20 million
  • Company opens new landing gear plant for "most important contract" ever
  • Nanotechnology can help clean up oil spills with super-absorbant carbon nanotube sponges
  • Manufacturing sector rebounded in February: Statistics Canada
  • Pharma company shares surge on favourable Q2 report
Scroll to Top