Ford’s 347 kph GT: World’s fastest supercar a testbed for new automotive technology

The team of automotive engineers behind Ford’s GT had three goals when they first began work in 2013. According to Ford’s Chief Technical Officer, Raj Nair, “The first was to use it as a training ground for our engineers as we develop future engine technology and stretch our understanding of aerodynamics. Then, to push the boundaries of advanced material usage, such as lightweight carbon fiber.”

 

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Spectacular Ultra Super Car Ford’s 347 kph GT.

 

Though Ford had not originally intended to smash any records, they were nonetheless successful in creating the fastest supercar in automotive history.

The GT has far surpassed expectations, reaching speeds as high as 347 kilometers per hour. In doing so, it has brought to light some fascinating new technologies which are useful in making vehicles lighter, faster, and more efficient. Part of that came in the form of replacing steel and aluminum parts with carbon fiber, creating sleeker, more aerodynamic vehicles.

 

 

The 647-horsepower supercar sports a large, deployable wing at the rear, flaps capable of opening and closing, special ducts, hydraulic suspension, 3.5L EcoBoost V6, upward-swinging doors, and much more. The reshaped wing combined with the new gurney flap reportedly improves overall efficiency by fourteen per cent. “We are passionate about innovation through performance and creating vehicles that make people’s hearts pound,” said Ford President and Chief Executive Officer Mark Fields.

Even the world’s fastest car can’t beat radio in a police cruiser, but it was exciting:

 


Designed as an homage to the Ford GT40 racecar of the 1960s, the new GT was intended to participate in Le Mans. The GT dominated, as Ford’s factory team took first, third, and fourth positions in the GTE Pro class. Let us take a look at all the specs that make this magnificent vehicle the supercar that it is. The vehicle boasts twin-turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 24-valve V6, aluminum block, port and direct fuel injection, 7-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission with manual shifting mode, and 550 pounds per foot of torque at 5900 rpm.

With a base price of $453,750 and an application process that requires personal information such as basic info, current car collection, motorsport experience, etc. it appears that Ford is seeking very specific clientele to purchase the new GT. Though the entire process seems ridiculous and unnecessary, the company insists its reasoning is a desire to find customers who will actually drive and enjoy the vehicles rather than having them sit in garages and gather dust. That is certainly understandable. One thing is certain. The future owners of the Ford GTs will be extremely lucky to have this vehicle in their possession.

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