A tech-smart, airless, customizable tire, with replenishing tread unveiled by Michelin

Usually concept tires aren’t as exciting as concept cars, but Michelin wowed the industry with its visionary concept tire that not only runs airless, it has a brilliant replenishing tread feature. Oh, and it’s connected.
Michelin’s concept tire is a brilliant blend of airless honeycombed wheel-less structure, intelligent replinishible (and changeable) tread.
Michelin’s brilliant designers obviously believe tires can be as sexy as cars, and set out to prove it with an ultra-durable, biodegradable, smart-tech concept tire.  A honeycomb structure — recycled material that’s fully biodegradable (disposed tires are a critical landfill enviornmental issue) — gives it lightness and strength.

More brilliance: it can be adjusted to road conditions?

The design engineers weren’t content with just being extraordinary. Using 3D printing and smart technology, the tire treads can be replenished, but not just for durability and safety, but to customize tread patterns for road conditions.
Tied in with smart systems in the car, the tread can be 3D printed to match road conditions, or to replenish for wear.
From their press kit: “Imagine a future in which your tire is also a wheel: puncture-proof because there is no pressure. Its ruggedness comes from its biomimetic structure, as if it had been created by Nature… A wheel made of recycled materials and which is completely recycled at the end of its life, after having covered thousands and thousands of kilometers — as long as the vehicle itself.”

Intelligent and connected

It’s a given that cars have to be connected. To some extent tires are, via air pressure sensors. But Michelin is planning to engineer a tire that is highly connected in a smart car systems. No air pressure read out is needed, since there is no air, but the tire communicates tread wear, and type of tread pattern recommended for conditions (and even for time of day).
Although the “stations” are not currently available, Michelin envisions a future where you choose your tread, drive on to a 3D tread printer, wait ten minutes, and you have a set of winter tires.

SaveSave

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Twenty-kilometre tower would revolutionize space launches
  • Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid, first electric minivan, rolls out in Windsor
  • US energy self-reliance, pipeline uncertainty put Canada's energy sector at risk
  • New Samsung-Pattern wind farm underway with Siemens-built turbines
  • Manufacturing closer to stabilizing in January: report
  • China to totally ban gas and diesel in new car market; with interim targets of 20% electric or hybrid by 2025
  • Electric bush plane: combined project of Zenair and Solar Ship combines rugged short landings with green technology
  • Canada one of the world’s most energy-intensive countries: 15 percent energy reduction possible through lighting, computer and HVAC retrofitting: Conference Board of Canada Report
  • Local Ford union rebellion over GM contract threatens pattern bargaining
  • Large CSeries order builds momentum for Bombardier
  • No immediate car tariffs after U.S. trade meeting; at stake $350 billion in autos and parts imported to the U.S.
  • Time running out for dealing with global greenhouse emissions: report
  • Pratt & Whitney Canada to invest $275 million in Quebec plant
  • Robot from Oil & Gas Technology Centre may improve safety, enhance productivity and reduce costs for offshore oil and gas projects
  • Audit pans government's climate change progress
  • NASA Discovers Eighth Planet Circling Distant Star
  • Largest biomass power plant in NA set to open in Atikokan
  • GPS III set to launch December 18: U.S. Air Force to launch via Space X Falcon 9 paylod; will be harder to jam, more secure and accurate
  • Tesla Roadster not only zero-to-sixty in 1.9 seconds — the next iteration may actually fly, says Elon Musk, CEO
  • SNC-Lavalin to build $4.2 billion Champlain Bridge in Montreal
Scroll to Top