A tech-smart, airless, customizable tire, with replenishing tread unveiled by Michelin

Usually concept tires aren’t as exciting as concept cars, but Michelin wowed the industry with its visionary concept tire that not only runs airless, it has a brilliant replenishing tread feature. Oh, and it’s connected.
Michelin’s concept tire is a brilliant blend of airless honeycombed wheel-less structure, intelligent replinishible (and changeable) tread.
Michelin’s brilliant designers obviously believe tires can be as sexy as cars, and set out to prove it with an ultra-durable, biodegradable, smart-tech concept tire.  A honeycomb structure — recycled material that’s fully biodegradable (disposed tires are a critical landfill enviornmental issue) — gives it lightness and strength.

More brilliance: it can be adjusted to road conditions?

The design engineers weren’t content with just being extraordinary. Using 3D printing and smart technology, the tire treads can be replenished, but not just for durability and safety, but to customize tread patterns for road conditions.
Tied in with smart systems in the car, the tread can be 3D printed to match road conditions, or to replenish for wear.
From their press kit: “Imagine a future in which your tire is also a wheel: puncture-proof because there is no pressure. Its ruggedness comes from its biomimetic structure, as if it had been created by Nature… A wheel made of recycled materials and which is completely recycled at the end of its life, after having covered thousands and thousands of kilometers — as long as the vehicle itself.”

Intelligent and connected

It’s a given that cars have to be connected. To some extent tires are, via air pressure sensors. But Michelin is planning to engineer a tire that is highly connected in a smart car systems. No air pressure read out is needed, since there is no air, but the tire communicates tread wear, and type of tread pattern recommended for conditions (and even for time of day).
Although the “stations” are not currently available, Michelin envisions a future where you choose your tread, drive on to a 3D tread printer, wait ten minutes, and you have a set of winter tires.

SaveSave

Did you miss this?

Other Popular Stories

  • Canada's economy rebounds with stronger manufacturing, construction
  • Davie shipyard delivers "most complex" vessel ever built in NA
  • Electro Water Separation (EWS) or Electro Coagulation: Treatment system uses electricity to clean contaminated water
  • 21 auto parts companies in Ontario invest in new technologies with help from Ontario Government
  • Province lends steel maker $7 million for plant upgrades
  • Manufacturing grew in August; oil industry to lose $2.1 billion in 2015
  • Financial risks associated with emissions limits for Canada for oil and gas industries
  • Utility offers customers Tesla Powerwalls as home energy storage market heats up
  • A supersonic jet with no front window? NASA's X-59 uses a 4K monitor instead.
  • Natural gas industry outlines challenges, opportunities in Canada
  • Wood groups praising new six-storey construction limit
  • Ontario to invest $900 million in energy-saving retrofits in social housing, rental stock
  • Job losses in Alberta, gains in Ontario, leave employment flat in January
  • Engineering positions: what's in demand, what does it pay, what do you need to qualify? Top seven engineering positions
  • Mexican oil and gas re-opened to foreign companies after 76 years
  • Manufacturing sales up in November, government scraps duties on imported food ingredients
  • Bombardier takes orders for CSeries at Farnborough
  • Alphabet's Chairman praises Toronto technology as Google's Sidewalk Labs announces living "technology lab" for Toronto Portlands
  • Manufacturing sales up in December but down for the year on weak energy sector
  • Demand for industrial real estate soaring in Canada: report
Scroll to Top